Download 53 Interesting Things to Do in Your Seminars and Tutorials by Sue Habeshaw, Trevor Habeshaw, Graham Gibbs, Hannah Strawson PDF

By Sue Habeshaw, Trevor Habeshaw, Graham Gibbs, Hannah Strawson

Seminars and tutorials are staples of upper schooling classes - yet operating them good and making sure that they're powerful isn't effortless. fifty three fascinating activities on your seminars and tutorials presents useful feedback, each one attempted and established, for tactics to strengthen your specialist perform. The e-book is designed for dipping into to discover rules to dovetail together with your personal procedure and context. summary: fifty three useful principles for the enterprise and operating of seminars and tutorials are awarded. They conceal: how one can commence; student-led seminars; groupwork; scholar participation and accountability; review; written fabric; and the expression of emotions. for every of the information, an issue or factor is pointed out and a pragmatic instructing or studying process is proposed. in lots of instances the strategy is illustrated with examples. furthermore, strength stumbling blocks are thought of. total, the information are designed to assist reflective practitioners in expert and better schooling develop their repertoire of pedagogical concepts. keyword phrases: greater schooling; studying; pedagogy; specialist schooling; seminars; learn; educating; tutorials. the themes lined are wide-ranging. They contain: how you can start; student-led seminars; groupwork; scholar participation and accountability; review; written fabric; and the expression of emotions.

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43 Furniture 19 Helpful arrangements 19 a Sit in a circle if at all possible, so that everyone can see and communicate with everyone else, with no seats having special status. b Think carefully about where you position yourself in relation to the board and leave a gap in front of it, so that any group member can feel free to use it. c Anticipate the possibility of breaking up into sub-groups for some of the time (see also items 13, 15 and 20). d Give sub-groups a physical identity by seating them together.

18 Debate 42 19 Furniture The arrangement of furniture in the classroom is probably the single most important factor in determining the success of the tutorial. Unhelpful arrangements a If the teacher has a special desk, or a higher or larger chair, or even just a special place, this will give her added status and distance her from the students and will make it highly likely that she will dominate the session. b If students sit in rows facing the teacher, so that they cannot see one another’s faces, this will prevent interaction between them and put all the responsibility for the session onto the teacher.

OK, how about a line-up? . Can you all stand up, please? Let’s make a line across the room, facing the window, from the person with the most experience of this topic at that end to the person with the least experience at this end. If you’re not sure how your experience compares with other people’s, then you’ll have to talk to them and find out’. When students have decided where to place themselves in the line, you can choose how they should divide into sub-groups. They can join up with their immediate neighbours, in which case you get groups of similar people together, or you can organise mixed groups: if you have twelve students, for example, and you want to form mixed groups of three, you ask the students to number off in fours – 1, 2, 3, 4; 1, 2, 3, 4; 1, 2, 3, 4 – and then all the 1’s form a group, all the 2’s form a group, etc.

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