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By Mary Beth Norton, Jane Kamensky, Carol Sheriff, David W. Blight, Howard Chudacoff

A humans AND A kingdom is a best-selling textual content delivering a lively narrative that tells the tales of everyone within the usa. The authors' awareness to race and racial identification and their inclusion of daily humans and pop culture brings heritage to existence, enticing readers and inspiring them to visualize what lifestyles was once rather like some time past.

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Additional info for A People and a Nation: A History of the United States, Volume II: Since 1865, 9th Edition

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Chudacoff, the George L. Littlefield Professor of American History and Professor of Urban Studies at Brown University, was born in Omaha, Nebraska. B. D. (1969) from the University of Chicago. He has written Mobile Americans (1972), How Old Are You? (1989), The Age of the Bachelor (1999), The Evolution of American Urban Society (with Judith Smith, 2004), and Children at Play: An American History (2007). He has also co-edited with Peter Baldwin Major Problems in American Urban History (2004). His articles have appeared in such journals as the Journal of Family History, Reviews in American History, and Journal of American History.

2. To vote or be a delegate to constitutional conventions, men had to take an “iron-clad” oath (declaring that they had never aided the Confederate war effort). 3. ” The Confederate states were to be defined as “conquered enemies,” said Davis, and the process of readmission was to be harsh and slow. Lincoln, ever the adroit politician, pocket-vetoed the bill and issued a conciliatory proclamation of his own, announcing that he would not be inflexibly committed to any “one plan” of Reconstruction.

He proposed pardons to all ex-Confederates except the highest-ranking military and civilian officers. Then, as soon as 10 percent of the voting population in the 1860 general election in a given state had taken an oath to the United States and established a government, the new state would be recognized. Lincoln did not consult Congress in these plans, and “loyal” assemblies (known as “Lincoln governments”) were created in Louisiana, Tennessee, and Arkansas in 1864, states largely occupied by Union troops.

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